Dr. Priscilla Settee

Dr. Priscilla Settee

Keynote Speaker

Priscilla Settee is a member of Cumberland House Swampy Cree First Nations and a Professor of Indigenous Studies where she teaches an Indigenous Food Sovereignty course as well as other courses. Settee is Adjunct Professor for the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Manitoba and serves graduate students on Indigenous Food Sovereignty. She has won recognition nationally and internationally as an award-winning professor and as a global educator/activist. She is the author of two books: Pimatisiwin, Global Indigenous Knowledge Systems (2013) that looks at global Indigenous knowledge systems and The Strength of Women, Ahkameyimohk (2011) that examines the role of Indigenous women’s stories in establishing truth, reconciliation and social change. She is a co-editor of an early Indigenous textbook called Expressions in Canadian Native Studies (2001). Dr. Settee’s new co-edited book on Indigenous Food Sovereignty will be published in 2020. She also researches gang-exiting Indigenous youth and Indigenous social economies. She is a kohkum (grandmother) to Nya Lily and Lola Rose and is a founding member of the City Park community garden.Settee is on the Seed Save Canada board and a David Suzuki Fellow (2019-2020) where she is currently researching the impact of climate change on trapper’s livelihoods.

KEYNOTE TITLE : Northern Cree Climate Stories, Critical Ecological Humanitarian Concerns

DESCRIPTION : Land based Indigenous people’s worldview is based on timeless and respectful interdependence with the natural world and the Cree concept of pimatisiwin, or “the good life.” Based on her recent appointment as a David Suzuki Fellow 2019-2020 and her research visits, Dr. Priscilla Settee’s talk will focus on trapper’s messages to humanity arising from their observations of climate change. Changes to traplines and communities reflect pillaging systems of capitalist development and will result in irreversible damage to the world’s biodiversity, including our collective global food systems. Dr. Settee will include in her presentation ways that her people, the Cree, along with others, are posing alternatives. Students, researchers, and administrators are key to understanding the precarity of the natural world and their role within it.