Dr. Dawn Martin-Hill

Dr. Dawn Martin-Hill

Keynote Speaker

Dawn Martin Hill, Mohawk, has a PhD in Cultural Anthropology and is the founder of the Indigenous Studies Program at McMaster University. She resides at Six Nations and is a CIHR College of Reviewers Chair, member of CIHR Elders advisory board to CIHR-IIPH, UNESCO Hydrology Committee to name a few. She has been publishing Indigenous knowledge research since 1994. She has numerous peer reviewed publications in the Journal of Aboriginal Health on culture and Indigenous ways of knowing and healing. Her current research includes access to clean water, traditional ecological knowledge, and creating bilingual tools to increase capacity in her community. Her work as a PI for Global Water Futures: Co-Creation of Indigenous Water Quality Tools, an Indigenous knowledge led scientific team, and Ohneganos: Indigenous Ecological Knowledge, Training & Co-Creation of Mixed Method Tools, an all female-led team, is lauded by UN Water Committee and UNESCO as a model for Indigenous research globally. She has worked diligently to conserve and protect Indigenous knowledge and language as founder of the Indigenous Elders and Youth Council in partnership with the Amazon Conservation Team, UN University, Carlton Cartography, Mohawk College, and numerous other research partners. She is the only Indigenous female to lead a team with GWF and NSERC.

KEYNOTE TITLE : Ohneganos: Decolonizing Environmental Health Research

DESCRIPTION : From the perspective of the traditional Haudenosaunee, we speak in terms of responsibilities with respect to water, not in terms of water rights. From time immemorial, we have held the view that the “law of the land” is not man-made law, but a greater natural law, the Great Law of Peace ….the root words for “rain” in Mohawk means expensive, or precious or holy. Dr. Hill’s talk will provide an overview of her research, methodology, pedagogical practice, ethical protocols and tools created by community for community. With involvement from Mohawk women, academics, and community leads, a primary innovation of Dr. Hill’s project is the co-development of research design and analyses of complementary knowledge systems of Indigenous Knowledge (IK/TEK) and western science (WS) to meet the needs of community. Dr. Hill’s talk will explore how IK/TEK has been shown to strengthen socio-ecological community resilience within the multiple stressors of global climate change, promotes communities’ capacity to monitor future environmental challenges, builds youth health resilience related to water security, and assists community youth in water governance. Dr. Hill’s research has been advised by the establishment of a Haudenosaunee Environmental Health Task Force, Grandmothers Council, and Haudenosaunee Confederacy Council water committee. She will explore how collaboration based upon peace, power and righteousness might restore harmony, strength and balance to our natural world and to the Kaniatarowanenne.